Home > News

photo: TU/e +
photo: TU/e +
photo: TU/e +
photo: TU/e +
News
Archive

TU/e students present 3D printed concrete pavilion

(28-06-2016)

On Friday 24 June 2016 a demonstration session took place at the Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) in the Netherlands to show the possibilities of 3D concrete printing. Beside a live demonstration of the printer in action, printed objects of the current research were shown. The highlight was a pavilion that has been designed, printed and assembled by PhD candidates Zeeshan Yunus Ahmed en Rob Wolfs, with the help of some of the partner companies (I'M Architects, Van Wijnen Group, SG Weber Beamix, and Witteveen+Bos). The TU/e researchers have designed a concrete printer that has been in service for research since September 2015.

The chair of Concrete Structures of the TU/e runs a research programme on the 3D printing of concrete. The research is supported by a group of private partner enterprises from the whole chain of concrete construction. The actual research started after several months of initial testing of the printer setup. A group of PhD students and 4th and 5th year MSc students is working on it. Test methods are being developed and the material is experimented with, before and after curing. The influence of print parameters such as the printer head speed, are being investigated. The results will be used in a model that can predict the behaviour of the concrete during printing.

Besides the fundamental research into material behaviour, the experiments on the possibilities of the technique of 3D concrete printing are further explored. This resulted among other things, in a pavilion on a for the building industry relevant scale. It reaches 2 m height, and measures approximately 3,5 x 2,5 m in plan. The pavilion shows the form-freedom that can be achieved without complex, time-consuming moulds. Simultaneously, it introduces questions: how do we connect printed elements? Is the print surface also the (horizontal) construction surface, or are there other possibilities? How do we guarantee the structural safety? The pavilion thus sets the tone for future research.

More information on www.tue.nl/3dconcreteprinting